Cape Cod Women – RETRO TRURO/JOBI POTTERY

Cape Cod Women – RETRO TRURO/JOBI POTTERY

Click here to view the full article Through a synchronistic turn of events, Susan Kurtzman, returned to her youthful passion of pottery and design. As the owner of Jobi™ Pottery, a Cape Cod cottage industry, Kurtzman carries on the tradition of hand made, hand painted pottery begun by the original owners, Joe Colliano and Bill Hastings, in 1951. Since buying Jobi Pottery four years ago from second owners, the Locke family, Kurtzman has been fascinated by its local history. The name Jobi is well known and respected, Kurtzman says, “I’m proud of carrying on this Truro tradition.” When someone stops her in town and calls her the “Jobi lady”, she is flattered. “I love talking with customers.” She never tires of sharing Jobi Pottery’s story or educating visitors about the steps in making the pottery. Original mid-century molds are used for creating dinnerware, serving pieces, vases, mugs, and specialty items. Kurtzman paints the original minnow, cattail, pussy willow and lighthouse designs freehand. She also creates her own colorful contemporary designs. This business is a “takes a village kind of thing,” says Kurtzman. Steve Locke became her production manager and “right arm”, and several local women help out in the gallery. Kurtzman says, “Even when we’re closed we’re here working. We encourage people to call or stop by anytime!” Open May-October 7 days a week from 10am-5pm. Weekends in April, November and December. Call or just come...

Read More

Cape Arts Review – The Art Scene at Depot Road

Cape Arts Review – The Art Scene at Depot Road

Click here to view the full article TAKE A DRIVE DOWN Depot Road in the center of Truro and it’s like going back 100 years in time. There are more trees now and fewer farms, but it still has some of the most historic homes in town. Surprisingly, this quiet road has now become THE place for art in Truro. This summer, artists Tom Watson and Francie Randolph, who live and work at 45 Depot Road, and Susan Kurtzman, owner of Retro Truro and Jobi Pottery at 3 Depot Road, are joining forces in a gala opening on Tuesday, August 14 from 5 to 8 p.m. to be held at both studios. In addition they will hold Open Studios on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 am to 12 pm at both locations throughout the summer. Tom Watson will be showing his newest oil paintings featuring Truro land- scapes and seascapes. An avid gardener and fisherman, Watson captures the rural beauty of the Outer Cape today. Francie Randolph will be showing contemporary works which suspend photographs within encaustics (see article on page 28). As well as the beloved Jobi pottery, Kurtzman will also be showing the work of Milton Wright (1920-2005) and Marston Hodgin (1903-2003). Hodgin founded the Fine Arts Department at Miami University, Dayton, Ohio, and Wright was one of his students. Lifelong friends and colleagues, they both began painting in Province- town and Truro in the 1940s and eventually moved their families to North Truro. Wright is best known for his “colorist” style; his early Provincetown and Truro town and landscapes are widely collected. Hodgin is best known for his landscape...

Read More

Cape Cod Life Article – A Cape cottage industry evolves, yet stays true to its Truro roots

Cape Cod Life Article – A Cape cottage industry evolves, yet stays true to its Truro roots

Click here to view the full article BY JANICE RANDALL ROHLF PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN CUTRONA www.capecodlife.com CAPE COD LIFE 109 110 AUGUST 2007 www.capecodlife.com A Cape cottage industry evolves, yet stays true to its Truro roots. Using the fine point of a small paintbrush, Susan Kurtzman whips two strokes of black over a splotch of blue on an unglazed white pottery bowl, and, voilà, a fish appears. A rapid-fire dot of black makes an eye, and a hasty squiggle yields the illusion of gills. Creating this little minnow has taken five seconds . . . or less. Kurtzman continues. More and more minnows—yellow, red, and green—take shape until there’s an entire school swimming on the surface of the bowl. She puts it down, picks up a plate, and repeats the artistic choreography. Nothing could seem simpler; a kid could do it, many would say, and that’s where they’d be wrong. “Joe would sit with me for hours and hours, day after day for months, until I got it just right,” says Kurtzman, seated in her Depot Road studio, Retro Truro, overlooking INSET, TOP: Joe Colliano and Susan Kurtzman. Colliano started Jobi Pottery in 1951 with the late Bill Hastings. Kurtzman bought the business two years ago. OPPOSITE: The minnow is a traditional Jobi design, originally conceived in the 1950s. Steve Locke, above, whose parents took over the business in the 1970s, mans the production end of Jobi Pottery. OPPOSITE: Red is new to the Jobi line, as is painting the minnows out of formation. the Pamet River. Joe is Joe Colliano, now 81, one half of Jobi Pottery; the “bi” is for Bill Hastings who passed away in 2002. Joe and Bill were a couple for more than 50 years, and during that time they produced thousands of pieces of pottery in a convert- ed hot dog stand near the Highland Lighthouse. Jobi Pottery, with its unique retro-looking shapes and designs, is now highly collectible. Kurtzman, a former New York City advertising executive who moved to Truro in 2000, was curator of the Highland House Museum when one day, she remembers, Joe walked in and said, “I’m burning everything.” Curious, Kurtzman asked the then-stranger-to-her what he was setting on fire, and, fortunate- ly, talked him out of it. In addition to donating some 300 price- less photographs to the museum, Joe took Kurtzman under his wing and today, as the owner of Jobi Pottery, she is dedicated to perpetuating the original designs. Along with the trademark minnows, traditional Jobi patterns include blueberries, cattails, and sandpipers, all of which are currently replicated by Kurtzman and her “apprentices,” mostly local people she has trained with the same discerning eye as Joe...

Read More